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Senora Davis Dies at Age 75

Senora Margaret Davis was 75 when she died last Monday, Jan. 19 and, as far as her family's concerned, the community's lost someone very special.

"She was as close to a saint as you can get, without being one," said her daughter, Rebecca Ann Mondres, of Virginia Run. "She didn't seek attention for herself, but was always doing things for other people."

Davis and her husband of almost 57 years, Charles "Mickey" Davis, 78, lived in Centreville's Virginia Run community for nearly 11 years. They met when she was 17 and he was 20; Mickey's father introduced them on a blind date.

"She wasn't vain," he said. "So many other girls played games, and she didn't. She made strong friendships and had a good sense of humor. She was my best friend."

The couple married, April 14, 1947, when Senora — who was born and raised in Washington, D.C. — was in her senior year at Veterans High School (now called Duke Ellington School of the Performing Arts) in Georgetown.

"I'd just come back from World War II; I was in the Seabees," said Mickey. "We'd known each other about nine months, got married during Easter vacation and graduated together in June of 1947." In their case, he said, marrying young worked out. "We raised each other," he said.

Mickey went to Catholic University, where he obtained his bachelors, masters and Ph.D. in physics and then worked for the federal government at the Naval Ordinance Lab. He was also a physics professor at American University, worked at the Naval Research Lab in Washington, D.C., and co-founded the Navy's fiber-optics sensor program.

He then worked for Dynamics Systems Inc. and later co-founded Optical Technologies Inc. of Reston, before retiring. Meanwhile, Senora worked as a bookkeeper at Union Trust Bank in northwest Washington, for eight years. After that, she was busy raising their family — a son and three daughters.

BESIDES MONDRES, who's married, has four children and runs a Montessori school, the Davises are also the parents of: Kathleen Lee Davis, married and a high-school teacher in Maryland; Theresa Sue O'Neil, married, mother of two and a nurse at Inova Fairfax Hospital; and Thomas Scott Davis, single and in the Merchant Marines in Manila, Philippines. The six grandchildren are Lauren and Matthew O'Neil and Jessica, Ashley, Zachary and Tyler Mondres.

Prior to moving to Centreville, the Davises lived for 27 years in McLean, where Senora worked in a thrift shop, Treasure Trove, whose proceeds went to Inova Fairfax Hospital. She donated many hours to local charities and supported overseas missions. She also worked with church groups at Silver Spring Baptist Church, the Christian Assembly in Tysons Corner, Centreville Baptist Church and The King's Chapel in Fairfax.

Senora had Airedale dogs and loved horses. She and her husband spent many summers in Ocean City, Md., and enjoyed traveling together. "We went on safari at the Wild Animal Farm in San Diego County, [Calif.], and went whale watching off the coasts of Mexico and California," he said. "We also traveled to most of the national parks, several times, and to Europe and Hawaii."

Her children also remember her as a wonderful mother and grandmother. "She was a special lady and always thought of everybody else first," said Mondres. "She was a caretaker to everyone."

"She was always there for us," her daughter continued. "She was very careful with her opinions and gave us advice sparingly. She would never push things on you, but would give her opinion when asked."

Mondres recalled how much her mother loved Christmas and made it memorable for her family. She'd put up two Christmas trees, place a village under one and decorate the whole house. Said Mondres: "She loved that time of year and made it special for everyone else."

All was well, until 4 1/2 years ago, when Senora was diagnosed with ovarian cancer. "She never complained, never cried," said her husband. "She had extensive chemotherapy and several operations, but she managed to do well through it all. And she still traveled with me; she wasn't confined to bed until the last week."

TOWARD THE END, she was being cared for by Hospice, and Mickey said they did an "excellent job." But she succumbed to complications from her illness, Jan. 19, at her home. Their son had been with them, the past 1 1/2 months, and he and Mickey were with her when she died.

A memorial service — "To a life well-lived," said her husband — will be held Thursday, Jan. 29, at 3 p.m. at Lee Funeral Home, 8521 Sudley Road in Manassas. The Rev. Bill Jeschke of The King's Chapel will officiate. Burial will be private.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Kings Chapel Building Fund, P.O. Box 308, Oakton, VA 22124. She was preceded in death by her parents, Gordon Jessup and Daisy Jessup (Thomas).

Although saddened by the loss of his wife and lifelong friend, Mickey remembers the happy times they shared together traveling or with friends and family. "Anytime I was with her was special," he said. And, he added, he's comforted because "I am not uncertain about where she is."

Mondres, too, feels better when she thinks about her mother and what she meant to her. "She was a funny and caring lady and didn't take herself seriously," she said. "I have so many friends who thought of her as their adopted mom. I miss her."

<2b>Centre View

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Senora Margaret Davis was 75 when she died last Monday, Jan. 19 and, as far as her family's concerned, the community's lost someone very special.

"She was as close to a saint as you can get, without being one," said her daughter, Rebecca Ann Mondres, of Virginia Run. "She didn't seek attention for herself, but was always doing things for other people."

Davis and her husband of almost 57 years, Charles "Mickey" Davis, 78, lived in Centreville's Virginia Run community for nearly 11 years. They met when she was 17 and he was 20; Mickey's father introduced them on a blind date.

"She wasn't vain," he said. "So many other girls played games, and she didn't. She made strong friendships and had a good sense of humor. She was my best friend."

The couple married, April 14, 1947, when Senora — who was born and raised in Washington, D.C. — was in her senior year at Veterans High School (now called Duke Ellington School of the Performing Arts) in Georgetown.

"I'd just come back from World War II; I was in the Seabees," said Mickey. "We'd known each other about nine months, got married during Easter vacation and graduated together in June of 1947." In their case, he said, marrying young worked out. "We raised each other," he said.

Mickey went to Catholic University, where he obtained his bachelors, masters and Ph.D. in physics and then worked for the federal government at the Naval Ordinance Lab. He was also a physics professor at American University, worked at the Naval Research Lab in Washington, D.C., and co-founded the Navy's fiber-optics sensor program.

He then worked for Dynamics Systems Inc. and later co-founded Optical Technologies Inc. of Reston, before retiring. Meanwhile, Senora worked as a bookkeeper at Union Trust Bank in northwest Washington, for eight years. After that, she was busy raising their family — a son and three daughters.

BESIDES MONDRES, who's married, has four children and runs a Montessori school, the Davises are also the parents of: Kathleen Lee Davis, married and a high-school teacher in Maryland; Theresa Sue O'Neil, married, mother of two and a nurse at Inova Fairfax Hospital; and Thomas Scott Davis, single and in the Merchant Marines in Manila, Philippines. The six grandchildren are Lauren and Matthew O'Neil and Jessica, Ashley, Zachary and Tyler Mondres.

Prior to moving to Centreville, the Davises lived for 27 years in McLean, where Senora worked in a thrift shop, Treasure Trove, whose proceeds went to Inova Fairfax Hospital. She donated many hours to local charities and supported overseas missions. She also worked with church groups at Silver Spring Baptist Church, the Christian Assembly in Tysons Corner, Centreville Baptist Church and The King's Chapel in Fairfax.

Senora had Airedale dogs and loved horses. She and her husband spent many summers in Ocean City, Md., and enjoyed traveling together. "We went on safari at the Wild Animal Farm in San Diego County, [Calif.], and went whale watching off the coasts of Mexico and California," he said. "We also traveled to most of the national parks, several times, and to Europe and Hawaii."

Her children also remember her as a wonderful mother and grandmother. "She was a special lady and always thought of everybody else first," said Mondres. "She was a caretaker to everyone."

"She was always there for us," her daughter continued. "She was very careful with her opinions and gave us advice sparingly. She would never push things on you, but would give her opinion when asked."

Mondres recalled how much her mother loved Christmas and made it memorable for her family. She'd put up two Christmas trees, place a village under one and decorate the whole house. Said Mondres: "She loved that time of year and made it special for everyone else."

All was well, until 4 1/2 years ago, when Senora was diagnosed with ovarian cancer. "She never complained, never cried," said her husband. "She had extensive chemotherapy and several operations, but she managed to do well through it all. And she still traveled with me; she wasn't confined to bed until the last week."

TOWARD THE END, she was being cared for by Hospice, and Mickey said they did an "excellent job." But she succumbed to complications from her illness, Jan. 19, at her home. Their son had been with them, the past 1 1/2 months, and he and Mickey were with her when she died.

A memorial service — "To a life well-lived," said her husband — will be held Thursday, Jan. 29, at 3 p.m. at Lee Funeral Home, 8521 Sudley Road in Manassas. The Rev. Bill Jeschke of The King's Chapel will officiate. Burial will be private.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Kings Chapel Building Fund, P.O. Box 308, Oakton, VA 22124. She was preceded in death by her parents, Gordon Jessup and Daisy Jessup (Thomas).

Although saddened by the loss of his wife and lifelong friend, Mickey remembers the happy times they shared together traveling or with friends and family. "Anytime I was with her was special," he said. And, he added, he's comforted because "I am not uncertain about where she is."

Mondres, too, feels better when she thinks about her mother and what she meant to her. "She was a funny and caring lady and didn't take herself seriously," she said. "I have so many friends who thought of her as their adopted mom. I miss her."