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Marvin Powell Is Named Lord Fairfax

As a member of the Phi Beta Sigma fraternity, Centreville resident Marvin Powell first learned to serve his community in college. His fraternity involvement turned into a lifelong commitment to volunteer work.

POWELL’S efforts have not gone without notice, as he was recently named the 2006 Lord Fairfax for the Sully District, an award designated for individuals who are dedicated to helping the Fairfax County community. Supervisor Michael R. Frey (R-Sully), who selected Powell for Lord Fairfax, had high praise for him. "Marvin represents Sully on the Small Business Commission and he has been active in helping form a Centreville Rotary Club," said Frey. "But primarily, the reason I chose Marvin is because of his leadership on the Centreville Community Foundation (CCF)."

Powell, 40, who also works part time, was honored to receive the award, but is focused on the future. “It’s a distinct honor as a younger person but it also means that there’s a lot of work to be done,” he said. “It makes a big difference to see that I’m considered among the community leaders in Northern Virginia.”

Since Powell took over as chairman three years ago, said Frey, he's broadened CCF's involvement with the community and got it to start a scholarship. Frey noted, as well, that Powell was part of the group instrumental in moving the Centreville Day celebration into the Historic District "which has helped the day become popular and grow."

Powell explained his plans for the future. “I want to reach out to the youth. We are building a scholarship foundation for the three high schools in Centreville,” he said. “We do a scholarship through Westfield High School and we are trying to expand that program.” He also wants to do more for business owners in Centreville.

IN ADDITION, Powell explained that he wants to open the community to newer citizens. Many minority populations are moving into the area and Powell hopes that the CCF can help them out.

Frey was also pleased with CCF’s “Welcome to Centreville” sign program that Powell worked on. “We raised the funds to get signs done and we are going to do more,” Powell said. Currently, there are two signs on Lee Highway, and two more signs will go up on Route 28.

Frey said, "You just see the foundation starting to do more things, and one of the things Marvin's done tremendously is recruit people. In all volunteer organizations, people change over time. But the good ones are constantly renewing their membership, and what Marvin has focused on a lot is bringing other people into the organization and helping them get involved in the community."

Said Powell: “It means a lot to do everything we can to help in the community we live in.”