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Art and Arf at Behnke’s Nursery

Getting Around

Behnke’s has gone to the dogs!

"Maggie," the Behnke mascot was there as were "Poppy," "Diva," "Buzz," and "Editor," among others.

They were the real cast of characters in attendance at the Potomac Artists in Touch (PAinT) opening reception for "The Dog Days of Summer" at Behnke Nurseries on Saturday, Aug. 4.

It was decidedly an art and arf evening where about 80 art and animal enthusiasts gathered at the River Road nursery to promote talent and tail-wagging while sipping Boordy Vineyards’ finest, accompanied by a delectable array of hors d’ oeuvres.

PAinT chose PetConnect as its philanthropic mission for this occasion. Fifteen local artists comprise the PAinT makeup. According to member Anne Martinez, the purpose of the 7-year-old organization is to encourage the appreciation of art in Potomac.

"They chose our group to benefit from a percentage of their art sales during ‘The Dog Days of Summer,’" PetConnect board member Carole Dell said.

PetConnect volunteers endeavor to find homes for dogs and cats who have either been abandoned or left in shelters. Their objective is to pair animals with suitable families. "We placed over 100 dogs following Hurricane Katrina, either by re-uniting them with their families or finding homes for them," Dell said.

"What we need most now are fostering parents," Dell explained. "Wherever we find a need we will take an animal and try to find a foster home for it until the right home comes along," she continued. The organization, comprised of six hard-core workers, and numerous others who pitch in on occasion, does not have a shelter for the animals. "But," Dell added, "we never give up."

WHILE THE FOUR-legged friends socialized, with the exception of "Tandi," a tabby cat who nestled in her cage, their human counterparts admired wall after wall of paintings, including Cherry Dearie’s watercolors; Vian Borchert’s moderns including her award-winning "Young Man In Pink Tie;" Anne Martinez’s popular rooster; Karin Colton’s pigs; Terri Cunningham’s landscapes; and, one of the most popular of all, Mary Moltz’s portrait of "Biscuit," Flaps restaurant owner, Bob Rood’s late Hungarian sheep dog.

From beagles to bagels it was a class act.