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New Preschool for Homeless Children

Kim Baker, preschool director; Christopher Fay, Homestretch executive director; Richard Lanier, Tysons Rotary club; Mary Edwards, Tysons Rotary club; Jan Auerbach, McLean Rotary club; Gerry Hamilton, Vienna Rotary club; and Cherry Baumbusch, McLean Rotary club, pictured at the ribbon-cutting ceremony.

Kim Baker, preschool director; Christopher Fay, Homestretch executive director; Richard Lanier, Tysons Rotary club; Mary Edwards, Tysons Rotary club; Jan Auerbach, McLean Rotary club; Gerry Hamilton, Vienna Rotary club; and Cherry Baumbusch, McLean Rotary club, pictured at the ribbon-cutting ceremony. Photo Contributed

Homestretch, a nonprofit dedicated to helping homeless Fairfax families become self-sufficient, opened a preschool at its headquarters on Maple Avenue in Falls Church. Christopher Fay, executive director of Homestretch, and Kim Baker, preschool director, officiated at the ribbon-cutting ceremony on Sept. 13.

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Preschool Director Kim Baker with one of the preschool students.

Opening of the preschool, called Kidstretch, involved support from many public and private organizations. The City of Falls Church agreed to have a nearby park serve as the preschool playground. Dulin United Methodist Church provided substantial funding. Lewinsville Presbyterian Church provided money and books. Temple Rodef Shalom provided books and school supplies and helped assemble furniture. Clark Builders Group did the renovations of existing office space. Sherwin Williams donated the paint and their employees did the painting. Integrity Management bought the office furniture. Employees of Primatics Financial built the furniture and set up the classrooms. Ten Rotary clubs (McLean, Alexandria, Burke, Bailey’s Crossroads, Falls Church, Fairfax, Reston, Rosslyn/Fort Myer, Tysons, and Vienna) funded instructional materials and classroom supplies. These efforts will go to help children become “kindergarten-ready” so they can succeed in elementary school and beyond. Ultimately, the center hopes to have 30 children enrolled from among its 110 families.