Education

Drawn from the 15 weekly community newspapers published by Connection Newspapers.

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‘It’ll Make People Laugh, Feel Good’

Centreville High presents comedy, “Funny Money.”

An aptly named show that’ll have the audience roaring with laughter, “Funny Money” is Centreville High’s upcoming Cappies play.

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Turbo Tutoring Awards Scholarships

Turbo Tutoring, led by local educators Gregg Greentree and Dan Harris, recently announced winners for its annual scholarship award.

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Audience Will Have a Blast

West Springfield presents “The Pajama Game” from May 1-4.

The West Springfield High School drama department is hard at work preparing for their spring musical, “The Pajama Game,” which lead cast member and junior Barbara Lawson says is a lively show with talented performers. “There are a lot of popular songs in it that you may not know are in the musical but that you’ve heard before,” Lawson said. “It’ll be a really fun show.”

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French Students Visit Robinson

American and French students learn language, culture through exchange program.

For Monica Jugnet, a French teacher at Robinson Secondary School’s International Baccalaureate Program, teaching French is more than just advising students on grammar or learning verb conjugations. Exchange programs like the one taking place at Robinson this week is what makes learning a language worthwhile, she says.

Entrants Sought for Anti-Alcohol Awards

A Vienna-based, alcohol-education group wants to honor local, high school groups for their efforts in fighting underage drinking. To recognize high-school students for "doing the right thing," the nonprofit Washington Regional Alcohol Program (WRAP) will present its 2014 GEICO Student Awards at a May 16 ceremony in Washington, D.C., and is accepting applications for the honors through Monday, April 28, at http://www.wrap.org/files/youthOutreach.htm. Entry is free.

A Classic Romance Comes to the Stage

Woodson High presents ‘Pride and Prejudice.’

Featuring a cast and crew of 100, Woodson High will present the classic, romantic play, "Pride and Prejudice." And there’ll be entertainment, both on and offstage.

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Advocates Urge Supervisors to ‘Invest in Fairfax’

Coalition of schools, government employees, parks, libraries and human services gather at budget hearings.

“Invest in Us, Invest in Fairfax.” That was the rallying cry last week at the Fairfax County Government Center as advocates for schools, libraries, parks, government employees and other human services gathered in support of more funding in these areas.

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Achievement Gap Addressed at Budget Hearings

Admissions to Thomas Jefferson, cuts to Summer School, later start times discussed.

Of the 487 students admitted to the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology, only 10 are black. Eight of these students are Hispanic. This is even though 177 black students and 214 Hispanic students applied for admission to the school. “Unless you actually believe that black and Latino children have some type of intellectual deficiency that prevents them from competing for admission to TJ, you have to believe there is a failure in the Fairfax County Public School system in terms of preparing these students to adequately compete for admission to TJ,” said Tina Hone, former school board member and founder of the Coalition of the Silence (COTS), at the FY 2015 budget public hearing on April 8.

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Robinson Chorus Prepping for World Choir Games

Two ensembles from Robinson will travel to Latvia this summer.

After a Skype session with composer Sydney Guillaume, members of Robinson Secondary School’s choral group Robinson Singers were ecstatic. “It was just so exciting because he knows exactly what he wants it to sound like,” said junior Molly Wise. “It was so cool to have the composer teach us and to take the time to help us.” Guillaume is the composer of “Twa Tanbou,” one of the pieces Robinson Singers will be performing at the World Choir Games in Latvia this summer.

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Families, Community Advocate For Special Education Graduates

Supporters gathered at Fairfax County budget hearing on April 10.

Diana Martin, a Fairfax Station resident, was already losing sleep thinking about how she was going to balance the post-grad needs of her daughter Kenzie with her husband’s chemo and medical care. Now, she is even more concerned as funding for the programs that help special education graduates from Fairfax County Public Schools is included on a list of possible further reductions that County Executive Ed Long presented to the Board of Supervisors on March 18.

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Promoting STEM in Schools, Budget Hearings

Nifty Fifty STEM education events continue as students advocate for STEM at Fairfax public hearings.

As part of an effort to inspire students to pursue STEM careers and to spark interest in math and science, scientists visited Fairfax County Public Schools last week to talk about their careers and to provide insight on the field.

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Class of 2015 Presented with Class Rings

South County High School juniors celebrate with solemn ceremony.

In a solemn and formal ceremony, members of the South County High School Class of 2015 received their class rings, marking an important milestone and the symbolic transition into becoming upperclassmen.

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Junior ROTC Supports UCM

Each month this school year, the Army Junior ROTC students at West Potomac High School volunteered their time on a Friday afternoon at the UCM Food Pantry to organize and bag the USDA commodities for UCM’s clients.

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International Night at Hybla Valley

Hybla Valley Elementary held an International Night on Thursday, April 3. Student-made decorations were used by the physical education, art and music teachers to transform the hallways into several Halls of Nations. Even the ceiling was lined with kites inspired by international cultures.

4-Year-Olds Learn About Entrepreneurship

“Camila’s Lemonade Stand” author visits Potomac Nursery School.

“If you could start your own business — any business you wanted, what would you choose?” asked teacher Barbara Haas to her class of 4-year-olds at Potomac Nursery School. The question prompted answers from the children of “I would have a business where I could take care of animals” to “I would want to make delicious food for people.” Some wanted to become home builders, doctors or fire-fighters; others wanted to become lawyers to help other people.

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