Jeanne Theismann | Staff

Jeanne Theismann

Reporter

703-778-9436

An award-winning journalist, Jeanne Theismann began her career at WTNH-TV in New Haven, Conn., where she was a news reporter and anchor as well as co-host of the daily “Good Morning, Connecticut” program. She went on to work for Seaway Communications, the first minority-owned U.S. broadcasting company before moving to Tokyo, where she spent several years working as a writer and editor for the Yomiuri Shimbun, the world’s largest daily newspaper.

During her time overseas, Jeanne traveled extensively, covering the third Indochina War between Vietnam and Cambodia as well as the Seoul and Sydney Olympic games. She began several relief projects for children and refugees and has personally delivered more than five tons of medical supplies to orphanages throughout the world. She serves as a visiting professor at the Ukrainian Catholic University, in L’viv, Ukraine.

Jeanne serves on the board of directors for First Night Alexandria, the Alexandria Symphony Orchestra and the Alexandria Sportsman’s Club. She is a member of the National Press Club, American Legion Post 24 and Rotary International, and is the media representative for the City of Alexandria’s Local Emergency Planning Commission. She loves travel, technology and trivia and dreams of one day writing headlines for the New York Post.

Recent Stories

Tease photo

Alexandria: Takin’ It to the Streets

Del Ray Music Festival moves to The Avenue.

Changes are brewing for this year’s Del Ray Music Festival, including a new location and the debut of pop-up beer gardens, a first for an outdoor street festival in the City of Alexandria.

Tease photo

Alexandria: Beauticians, Barbers and Books

Literacy initiative targets youths on summer break.

Local barber shops and beauty salons across the city have united to promote Beauticians, Barbers and Books, a new literacy initiative to encourage children to continue reading throughout the summer.

Alexandria: Opening Day Fire Engulfs Al’s Steakhouse

Fundraiser to be held at Holy Cow July 14.

Al’s Steakhouse, a favorite in the Del Ray community for decades, suffered extensive damage when a three-alarm fire swept through the restaurant July 6, the grand reopening day for new owners Emily Breeding and the Breeding family.

Alexandria: Chamber Names '40 Under 40'

Chamber to honor city’s rising stars.

Forty of the city’s rising stars will be honored July 28 as the Alexandria Chamber of Commerce celebrates its inaugural 40 Under 40 awards program.

Tease photo

Alexandria: Titan Red Wins 6th Annual Alumni Baseball Game

The team rosters brought together alumni players from as far back as 1968.

The T.C. Williams Baseball Boosters played host to the 6th annual T.C. Williams Alumni Baseball Game June 17 when players from Alexandria public high schools gathered at Simpson Field for the match-up between teams Titan Blue and Titan Red.

Tease photo

Alexandria: SSA Bids Farewell to Retiring Board Members

At its annual luncheon.

Senior Services of Alexandria held its 2016 Annual Meeting at Goodwin House Alexandria June 22, recognizing past and current board members and welcoming new ones to the organization.

Tease photo

Alexandria: Police Chief Earl Cook To Retire in October

Earl Cook to step down Oct. 1.

After a 37-year career in law enforcement, Alexandria Police Chief Earl Cook has announced his retirement from the force effective Oct. 1.

Tease photo

Alexandria: Brunch Raises Funds For Surgical Services

The Board of Lady Managers held its annual Spring brunch June 12 at the Union Street Public House Restaurant.

Alexandria Police Chief Earl Cook Announces Retirement

City’s first African American Chief to step down Oct. 1.

After a 37-year career in law enforcement, Alexandria Police Chief Earl Cook has announced his retirement from the force effective Oct. 1.

Tease photo

Alexandria: WWII Veteran Dies at 95

Bill McNamara survived Normandy invasion.

At 15 years old, Bill McNamara was determined to join the U.S. Cavalry. But when he walked into the local armory one Friday night, he was told he was too young. Not to be dissuaded, he walked around the block, stepped back inside and this time gave his age as 18 to the recruiter. The year was 1936 and McNamara had joined what would become America’s Greatest Generation, one of thousands who left for battlefields half a world away never knowing if they would ever see home again.

More stories