Jeanne Theismann

Reporter

703-778-9436

An award-winning journalist, Jeanne Theismann began her career at WTNH-TV in New Haven, Conn., where she was a news reporter and anchor as well as co-host of the daily “Good Morning, Connecticut” program. She went on to work for Seaway Communications, the first minority-owned U.S. broadcasting company before moving to Tokyo, where she spent several years working as a writer and editor for the Yomiuri Shimbun, the world’s largest daily newspaper.

During her time overseas, Jeanne traveled extensively, covering the third Indochina War between Vietnam and Cambodia as well as the Seoul and Sydney Olympic games. She began several relief projects for children and refugees and has personally delivered more than five tons of medical supplies to orphanages throughout the world. She serves as a visiting professor at the Ukrainian Catholic University, in L’viv, Ukraine.

Jeanne serves on the board of directors for First Night Alexandria, the Alexandria Symphony Orchestra and the Alexandria Sportsman’s Club. She is a member of the National Press Club, American Legion Post 24 and Rotary International, and is the media representative for the City of Alexandria’s Local Emergency Planning Commission. She loves travel, technology and trivia and dreams of one day writing headlines for the New York Post.

Recent Stories

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Some Gave All: Police memorial in Alexandria dedicated to fallen officers.

Police memorial dedicated to fallen officers.

Judy Birney was just 12 years old when her father, youth detective Conrad Birney, was killed responding to a bank robbery in 1972. She went on to follow in her father’s footsteps, serving as an Alexandria police officer until 1999. On March 28, she joined more than 350 people for the dedication of the Alexandria Fallen Officers Memorial honoring the sacrifice of her father and 17 others who died in the line of duty.

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Obituary: ‘The Original Ballyshaner,’ Judge O'Flaherty

Judge Daniel O’Flaherty dies at 89.

To anyone appearing in his courtroom, his name invoked fear. But those who knew Judge Daniel O’Flaherty, knew him as a kind and quiet man, a proud Irishman devoted to his family and the City of Alexandria.

Helping Hands

Senior Services of Alexandria

Five years ago, Mary Lee Anderson was asked if she could help Senior Services of Alexandria set up an information database. Since that time, what was supposed to be a part-time commitment has turned into a second career for the international telecommunications corporate executive.

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Hawkins Steps Down From Alexandria EDP

Landrum named acting CEO.

Val Hawkins, credited with luring the National Science Foundation Headquarters away from its longtime home in Ballston, stepped down effective March 15 as president and CEO of the Alexandria Economic Development Partnership.

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There’s No Place Like Home, Alexandria

Carroll takes the helm at Inova Alexandria.

When Susan Turner Carroll, the recently named CEO of Inova Alexandria Hospital, says she is from Alexandria, she means it.

Obituary: Mary Ellen Feeney

Mary Ellen Feeney, a fourth generation Alexandrian, passed away peacefully March 9, 2015, in her home of 64 years on Richmond Lane. She was 89.

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Chamber Hosts Legislative Breakfast

Officials discuss top state, local issues.

The Alexandria Chamber of Commerce hosted members of City Council and the Virginia General Assembly at its annual Legislative Breakfast March 10 at the Hotel Monaco.

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Paving the Way in Alexandria

Basketball pioneer Earl Lloyd dies at 86

When Jackie Robinson broke baseball’s color barrier in 1947, he did it under the glare of a national spotlight. Three years later, on a snowy evening in 1950, a similar but quieter revolution took place when a black man stepped onto a court in Rochester, N.Y., marking the first time an African American had played for an NBA team. That man was Earl Lloyd.

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All in the Family for Alexandria

SSA to honor generations of giving.

’Twas the night before Christmas, literally, when a man walked into the Senior Services of Alexandria office and handed an envelope to then-executive director Janet Barnett. The year was 2007 and the man was Ron Bradley. “Ron asked how he could help the seniors of Alexandria,” Barnett said. “When I explained that the city did not provide meals to seniors on holidays, Ron stepped in with $10,000 to fund a holiday meals program. But he had a condition — that they could not be ordinary meals. He wanted our seniors to enjoy a festive meal just like we do at home.”

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Alexandrian WWII Veteran Remembers The Battle of the Bulge

‘We Were Annihilated’

It was one of the best kept secrets of World War II. When 20-year-old U.S. Army Medic Robert Wineland arrived in the village of Laudersfeld, the wooded countryside of far eastern Belgium was relatively peaceful, a quiet buffer zone disrupted only by occasional artillery fire and brief skirmishes between opposing infantry patrols. But on Dec. 16, 1944, the sleepy Ardennes front was about to wake up.

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