Politics

Politics

Drawn from the 15 weekly community newspapers published by Connection Newspapers.

Subscribe

Pandemic Creates Deeper Arlington Budget Shortfall

As the economic impacts from the COVID-19 pandemic continue, Arlington County is working to close the budget gap as a result of additional revenue shortfalls for the current fiscal year.

Tease photo

Civilian Oversight

City Council members to consider creating citizen board to investigate police

Last spring, disparities in law enforcement created a groundswell of support for a new civilian review board in Alexandria, a group that could investigate excessive use of force and abuse of authority. Since that time, the General Assembly passed a new law giving these kinds of bodies authority to subpoena documents and witnesses as well as make binding disciplinary determinations. Now members of the City Council are about to consider several options for what kind of civilian review board they want to create.

Tease photo

In-Person Early Voting Locations Open in Fairfax County

Voters cite ballot controversy and deep divide in the country.

The need to drop their ballot into a secure drop-off box or slide it into a voting machine, spurred thousands of voters to wait in long lines on the first day of in-person early voting at satellite locations in Fairfax County on Oct. 14.

Tease photo

Mobilizing Voters in Herndon

Locals gather for Women's March on Herndon, sister event of the D.C. Women's March 2020.

Demonstrators gathered Saturday, Oct, 17, shortly before 3 p.m, for the Women's March on Herndon, a grassroots event held in the community and part of the nationwide, socially distanced marches held in union with the Women's March 2020 in Washington, D.C.

Tease photo

Disparities in Arrests Lead to Questions about Police in Montgomery County Public Schools

Black and Hispanic students twice as likely to be disciplined with suspension all the way back to elementary school.

Black and Latino students are disproportionately affected by routine school discipline, suspensions, and by arrests in Montgomery County Public Schools.

Tease photo

Residents Protest Fairfax County Gun Ban

Open carry hike held in wake of new gun ordinance

A group of Fairfax County residents gathered Sept. 19 at the Dyke Marsh Wildlife Preserve for what was billed as an open carry hike along the Mount Vernon Trail in protest of the recent Board of Supervisors vote to ban guns on public property.

Behavioral Health Teams to Join Police on Mental Health Calls in Virginia

Marcus alert bill passes House and Senate, moves to Northam’s desk

Marcus alert bill passes House and Senate, moves to Northam’s desk

Tease photo

Black Lives Matter Ride Showcases a Different Arlington History

Across Arlington, residents are working to relearn history.

Jim Moore was looking out his shop window on Saturday, Sept. 26, to catch the Black Lives Matter Ride that was supposed to come by his shop in Hall’s Hill.

Tease photo

Bull Run Post Office Road: ‘That Road Is Narrow and Very Dangerous’

Supervisors OK large-truck ban

Bull Run Old Post Office Road is a winding, two-lane, country road, not intended to carry the heavy traffic an arterial road, such as Route 29, does.

Tease photo

Life Hangs in the Box Checked in Fairfax County

HR for County Schools tells staff to make a decision.

Tia Williams is an instructional assistant with diabetes and severe asthma at Fairfax County Public Schools (FCPS).

Tease photo

Limiting Neck Restraints

Lawmakers negotiate behind closed doors on how to curb police use of chokeholds.

When lawmakers began their special session on criminal justice reform in August, hopes were high that the General Assembly would send the governor a bill that banned police from using chokeholds. But now that the protesters have gone home and the lawmakers have moved behind closed doors to negotiate in a secret closed-door conference committee, advocates for criminal-justice reform are worried about what will emerge in the conference report that will be presented to the House and Senate.

Tease photo

The Other Alexandria: He Believed In the Constitution: Reverend Fields Cook

Reverend Fields Cook engaged in so many areas of endeavor during his lifetime that it would be impossible to write a short article on all the things he accomplished. His struggles became his strengths

He was born a slave in King Williams County, Virginia around 1817, and was author of the 1847 unpublished memoir, “Fields’ Observations.”

Tease photo

Alexandria’s Failed Experiment with Wards

Del Ray forced a ward system on Old Town. It didn’t end well.

Del Ray was furious. The Alexandria City Council was dominated by members from Old Town, and they took action in the interest of Old Town. People in Del Ray felt neglected and unheard. The elected members of council did not include one single solitary member from their neighborhood, and so people there were demanding the city abandon its at-large system of representation on the City Council and adopt a ward system similar to the one the city had before adopting the city manager form of government.

Name Change for Matthew Maury Elementary?

On Thursday, Sept. 17, 2020, the Alexandria City School Board voted to begin the process of officially considering the request to change the name of Matthew Maury Elementary School.

Celebrating National Hispanic and Latino Heritage Month

This month celebrates the cultural achievements and vast contributions the Latinx community has made to society for centuries.

Previous

Video