Michael Lee Pope | Staff

Michael Lee Pope

703-615-0960

Michael Lee Pope is an award-winning journalist who lives in Old Town Alexandria. He has reported for NPR, the New York Daily News and Northern Virginia Magazine. He has a master's degree in American Studies from Florida State University, and he is a former adjunct professor at Tallahassee Community College. Pope is the author of four books.

Recent Stories

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Turnover at City Hall

As the era of Justin Wilson draws to a close, what comes next?

The era of Mayor Justin Wilson is drawing to a dramatic finish, creating an open seat for mayor at City Hall for the first time in 20 years.

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Alexandria Ditches Jim Crow Zoning

Unanimous vote on City Council eliminates single-family housing.

zoning

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Zoned Out

City Council to determine future of single-family housing in Alexandria.

"We need to apply strict scrutiny on the zoning provisions we have and ensure that they do not have a disparate impact, particularly to ensure that some of the provisions are not segregating our communities." — Alexandria Mayor Justin Wilson

Home Sick in Alexandria

Outdated apartment complexes gush greenhouse gas emissions.

Apartments outdated

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Ebbin to Face Challenger in Alexandria

Senate race will be the lone contested election in Alexandria this November.

election

Dedicated Debate

City Council to consider removing traffic lanes from Duke Street.

Duke Street

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Northern Virginia Poised to Lose Influence

Democratic primary might shift power to Hampton Roads.

Democratic primary might shift power to Hampton Roads.

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Rethinking Duke Street

Alexandria to determine future of bus rapid transit along congested traffic corridor.

Duke Street

Road Rage Veto

Governor vetoes Ebbin bill investigating so-called ‘macho mufflers.’

Mufflers

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Budget in Transition

$881 million budget proposal unionizes firefighters, ditches Confederates, maintains tax rate.

Expenditures for the Alexandria Fire Department are expected to grow about 8 percent largely based on unionization of its workforce. The Department of Transportation and Environmental Services is setting aside $60,000 to replace street signs currently celebrating Confederate military officials. And half a million dollars has been set aside in contingent reserves for City Council members to load up the budget with their proposals ahead of the May 3 deadline. But none of those things are likely the first question that will be asked about the budget proposal for fiscal year 2024.

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