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Votes

Referendums, Duty Bring in Voters

By midmorning, voter turnout was higher than anticipated.

The referendums and a sense of duty brought voters out to the polls in Fairfax this "Election Tuesday." Although there were no hot congressional races to decide, Fairfax citizens wanted to voice their opinion on the sales-tax referendum and the bond items.

"I usually vote for all elections," said Fairfax resident Albert W. Litschgi.

At the polling station at the John C. Wood Municipal Complex, a steady stream of voters came in to vote. When the polls opened at 6 a.m., there was a line of 20 people waiting outside. Inside, there was a one- to two-person wait for a polling booth.

Volunteers monitoring the polling station were surprised by the turnout.

Turnout is "heavier than usual," said election officer Diance Masincup. "My guess would be the sales-tax issue."

Fellow election officer Ken Loveland agreed.

"It's been a little bit heavier than we expected. It's the tax issue that people are coming out for," Loveland said.

Outside of the station, transportation-tax supporter Teddy Goodson of Fairfax was distributing fliers about the tax. Although this was her first year to distribute political fliers on Election Day, she said others had told her that the turnout would be lower, were it not for the referendum.

"It's the referendum, otherwise they wouldn't be out," Goodson said.

A few voters came to vote with children in tow. Gail Perkins came with her three children. She wanted to support the state-park referendum. When asked if she votes regularly, she replied that she did.

"Every time I can. I haven't missed yet," Perkins said.

Other voters going to the polls held similar sentiments. Good citizenship requires one to vote, they said.

When asked what issue they came to vote for, Bruce and Carol Reeves said voting was their issue.

"Because we're citizens," they replied.

Another voter agreed.

"The greatest gift I was ever given was to be born a United States citizen," said Fairfax resident Steven Turner.