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Hosting Community on Passover

March 21 reception recognized donation of 100-plus Haggadot from Mike Berger of Vienna.

On March 21, Rabbi Chessy Deitsch of the Chabad Tysons Jewish Center thanked Vienna resident Mike Berger for his donation of more than 100 Haggadah to the center. The collection belonged to Berger’s father.

On March 21, Rabbi Chessy Deitsch of the Chabad Tysons Jewish Center thanked Vienna resident Mike Berger for his donation of more than 100 Haggadah to the center. The collection belonged to Berger’s father. Photo by Donna Manz.

Passover Seder at Chabad Tysons Jewish Center Open to All

First Seder Night, Monday, April 14, begins at 7:30 p.m.; second Seder night: Tuesday, April 16, begins at 8:30 p.m.

Chabad Tysons Jewish Center, 2107 Chain Bridge Road, Vienna, 22182 (corner of Chain Bridge Road and Horseshoe Drive). RSVP 703--821-7770. Hosted by Chabad Tysons Jewish Center, Rabbi Chessy Deitsch. For more details, email rabbi@chabadtyson.... To learn more about Chabad Tysons Jewish Center, visit www.ChabadTyson.com.

Passover or Pesach celebrates the deliverance of the Jewish people from slavery in Egypt. The sacred holiday begins sunset of Monday, April 14, and ends nightfall of Tuesday, April 22. The commemoration begins with the Passover ritual, the Seder, in which followers of the Jewish faith read from the family Haggadah, breaking for a traditional feast. At its core, the Haggadah narrates the story of the Exodus from Egypt.

On March 21, the Chabad Tysons Jewish Center, in Vienna, recognized a donation of more than 100 Haggadot [Jewish texts] from Mike Berger, a Vienna resident whose father collected the versions throughout his lifetime.

THE CHABAD TYSONS JEWISH CENTER is a close-knit community that welcomes newcomers as warmly as it welcomes old friends. And on Monday and Tuesday, April 14 and 15, the Chabad Tysons invites Jewish and non-Jewish neighbors to participate in the Passover Seder experience.

"Everyone is welcome," said Rabbi Chessy Deitsch. "The Chabad Seder is like family; it’s home away from home." Rabbi Deitsch promised a warm environment, a "delicious" catered traditional Seder dinner, insights, singing, four cups of wine, and Matzah. "Whether you are a Seder veteran or a curious explorer, the Chabad Seder offers a stimulating and satisfying experience," Rabbi Deitsch said.

The Seder, which means "order" in Hebrew, follows a traditional protocol. The leader of the Seder leads the prayers and songs and the Haggadah is passed from guest to guest who recites passages. Sometimes, children act out a vignette.

The first known completed manuscript of the Haggadah was written in the 10th century. In 1482, with the introduction of the printing press, the first printed Haggadah was produced and is now housed in a Jerusalem library. The story of the emancipation of the Israelites is a story of plagues and of faith, of suppression and of freedom.

The eight-day festival of Passover is celebrated in the early spring, from the 15th through the 22nd day of the Hebrew month of Nissan. After more than 200 years of enslavement to the Egyptian pharaohs, God sent Moses to Pharaoh with a message, "send forth my people, so that they may serve me." When God visited the last of the plagues upon the Egyptians, he "passed over" the home of the children of Israel, sparing them. The Israelites fled, taking with them their unleavened bread. Matzah is central to the Seder dinner.

READING THE HAGGADAH at the Seder table fulfills the commandment to recount to new generations the story of the Israelites’ Exodus from Egypt. For many local Jewish families, it’s a living heritage.

"Judaism is both a religion and a culture," said Steve Hyatt of McLean. "The Chabad embraces the cultural side of the people."

Hyatt’s family comes to the Chabad Tysons Jewish Center the first night of Passover. The second night is spent at the Hyatt home, a "more intimate" personal experience, said Hyatt. There’s a lot of symbolism in the Haggadah, he said.

"The main thing of the Seder is that it shares the story of your people; you learn what your roots are," Hyatt said.

To RSVP to the Passover Seder or for more details, email rabbi@chabadtysons.com or call 703-821-7770. To learn more about Chabad Tysons Jewish Center, visit www.ChabadTyson.com.