0
Votes

Railroad Museum Becomes Wildlife Habitat

From left—Joanne Neckel and Bev Worek. Neckel headed the effort to ensure that all of the necessary certification elements were present on the museum’s grounds.

From left—Joanne Neckel and Bev Worek. Neckel headed the effort to ensure that all of the necessary certification elements were present on the museum’s grounds.

With the help of the Clifton Community Woman’s Club (CCWC), The Fairfax Station Railroad Museum has been certified as one of the National Wildlife Federation’s Certified Wildlife Habitats. The NWF is encouraging everyone to pursue turning their backyards into habitats. This is the 40th year for the program and over 150,000 habitats have been certified. A recent study proved that these yards and areas provide for and sustain more wild life than non-certified areas. To earn certification, your yard must provide a food source such as natural plants or bird feeders; a water source such as a birdbath or pond; cover such as evergreens and shrubs; and a place to raise young such as dense shrubs and vegetation. For more information visit NWF.org.

Joanne Neckel, CCWC member, headed the effort to ensure that all of the necessary certification elements were present on the museum’s grounds. Wildlife conservation is one of the CCWC’s initiatives and was pleased to partner with the museum to create such a habitat. “By teaming up with the museum, we hope to inspire others to create habitats in their backyards. It’s an easy and fun family project that makes a huge difference for wild life,” says Bev Worek, CCWC president.

The Clifton Community Woman’s Club was founded in 1971 as a non-profit organization dedicated to serving Clifton and the surrounding community. Through their donations they support food banks, women and children’s causes, wounded warriors, libraries and college scholarships to name a few. Contact: CliftonCWC.org—P.O. Box 229 Clifton, VA 20124.

Fairfax Station Railroad Museum is located at 11200 Fairfax Station Road in Fairfax Station. The museum portrays the history that the station played in the region during the 1800s and 1900s. The museum is supported completely by volunteers and is a non-profit organization.