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Viewpoints: Volunteering on MLK Day

"Whoever you are, or wherever you come from, you can share your time and do small things that make a big difference to other people. I think that's the message of this day."
--Nurhaeni, a Northern Virginia Community College student and volunteer from Indonesia

"Whoever you are, or wherever you come from, you can share your time and do small things that make a big difference to other people. I think that's the message of this day." --Nurhaeni, a Northern Virginia Community College student and volunteer from Indonesia Photo by Victoria Ross.

— Residents of Fairfax County share their thoughts about MLK Day.

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"I like to try to help people who need it. I like all the things that Martin Luther King, Jr. did to help people." --Gavin Saul, 10, Clifton

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"It was our family’s resolution this year to volunteer more. We want everyone to have the same opportunities that we have. I think that’s what Martin Luther King is about." --Madison Chase, 10, with mom Kerri Chase, Springfield

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"I think it’s important to find the good in each person and try to make a difference in each other’s lives. We’re a military family, so diversity is a fact of life. We don’t always realize how blessed we are, and how important it is to give back to others, to live the Golden Rule. " --Nancy Barr, Springfield

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"Martin Luther King, Jr. said some profound things. He believed that an individual can change the world with peace, compassion and caring. When you give young children the opportunity to volunteer, they learn an important message, one that will stay with them as adults." --Jeanne Sanders, Volunteer Fairfax Executive Director

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"We want to be here because if Dr. King was never alive, black and white people couldn’t be together, or eat at restaurants together or play sports together. We want to celebrate his birthday by helping others." --Christian Williamson, 10, Fairfax

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"It’s a day to do something for other people. I liked making the Valentine’s Card for people at nursing homes, because I don’t think they usually get cards. I also liked putting the bags together with socks and blankets to keep people warm. I wrote a note inside that said ‘Hope to you and all others.’" --Dana Schofield, 8, Fairfax