Immigration

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Building a Better Life

An Afghan immigrant’s story: From Soviet war to American Dream.

“Personally, I never think anyone is better than me, and I never think I’m better than anyone,” Bob Zahory of Centreville chuckles as he offers up another pomegranate lemonade.

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Living Life in ‘The Dream Land’

Jorge Adeler shares his story of the American Dream coming true.

The American Dream has been shared for generations—some call it an idea; others call it a reality. Many people come leaving behind former lives in search for better ones, not only for themselves but also for their children.

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Social Programs Adapt To Fulfill Immigrant Needs

Fellowship House, Interfaith help immigrants on their way to self-sufficiency.

A visitor to Hunter’s Woods Fellowship House in Hunter’s Woods Square in Reston could hear 21 different languages.

Opinion: Immigrants and Today’s Faith Response

The presence of increasing numbers of immigrants is a challenge to the Fairfax County faith community commitments. The challenge is to be a faith community with open arms.

Editorial: Learning in a Global Community

Students in Fairfax County speak 160 languages.

This week our ongoing series about immigration in Fairfax County takes a look at county schools, and some of the joys and challenges of having a diverse student body that speaks as many as 160 different languages at home.

Schools Using Diversity for Student Benefits

Immersion, ESOL programs aim to take advantage of area cultures.

As Fairfax County has experienced massive growth in its international population, its effects have spread to its educational institutions. Forty-four percent of the Fairfax County Public Schools students come from homes that speak a language other than English, which includes 160 different languages.

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We Are the World, at Garfield

Teachers discuss challenges of teaching English as a Second Language.

Garfield Elementary School in Springfield, like all of Fairfax County, has a population that reflects a wide range of backgrounds.

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Marshall High is the Face of Fairfax County

Upwards of 90 countries represented by student population.

The schools that feed into George C. Marshall High School are the academic home to children from all over the world.

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Opinion: Embracing Our Diversity

If you can ever find the time to attend a federal naturalization ceremony in Fairfax County for new citizens, do it. It reinvigorates one’s patriotism and reminds us all how lucky we are to be Americans.

Opinion: Celebrating Diversity Through Culture

So, when people from different countries, diverse cultures, and dissimilar values migrate to United States, they try to adjust and adapt to the new culture. But the onus should also be on American people to welcome them, to make them comfortable and feel at home. What do we do to create awareness about different cultures? Unfortunately, I have not seen much effort on the part of the government.

Editorial: Diversity Growing

Tune in to our series on immigration.

This week, the Connection kicks off a series about immigration, diversity and the growing population of foreign-born residents in Fairfax County. County reporter Victoria Ross opens with a story that captures vignettes and statistics of the changing population. It is a topic consistent with the original Thanksgiving story. More than 28 percent of Fairfax County's population is foreign born; that's 317,000 residents.

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Fairfax Becomes Immigrants’ Gateway

Focus on immigration.

Yesuf Beshir spent nearly three years gathering the mountain of paperwork he needed to leave Ethiopia and emigrate to America.

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A Way Out of No Way

Two women — one African-American and one from Africa — learn to see America through each other’s eyes.

Rosemary Osei, 22, and Lillie Reynolds, 61, have been good friends for four years. The two women, who help teach special needs students at a Vienna elementary school, are sometimes mistaken for mother and daughter.

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Viewpoints: Immigrants’ Experiences on Becoming Americans

On Sept. 22 at the Multicultural Festival on Lake Anne Plaza in Reston, 25 people participated in a naturalization ceremony that made them American citizens.

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